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Florida Carpentry Insurance quote and information.

  1. How do insurance companies define Carpentry Contractors?
  2. What risk exposure do Carpenters have?
  3. What is the price of Carpentry Contractor insurance?
  4. Is insurance for Carpentry Contractor required in Florida?
  5. What coverages are common to Carpentry businesses?
  6. My dad has a business where some fiberglass work and carpentry work is done we have 2 guys that come and work with us and they get a 1099. Do we have to have workers comp? We do have liability insurance Thanks, being harrassed from the owner of the whole property who allows others on their property with just liabilty.
  7. Can you provide insurance anywhere in the state?

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How do insurance companies define Carpentry Contractors?

Carpenters may perform interior work only, exterior work only, or both. Exterior carpentry includes framing work, such as the building of the structural support for a new building or structure, or an addition. Interior carpenters perform remodeling, repair, or finishing. Interior carpentry normally consists of either rough or finish work. Rough carpentry involves framing in windows and doors, laying floor joists and sub-floors, building stairs, etc. Finish work involves hanging doors, installing baseboards and molding around doors and windows, and making or installing cabinets, shelving or other built-ins.

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What risk exposure do Carpenters have?

Property Exposures
At the carpenter’s own location usually consist of office operation and material, equipment, and vehicle storage. If the carpenter does woodworking at his shop, there is a heavy fire exposure. Careful review of the dust collection system as well as separation and storage of flammable varnishes and glues are mandatory. Some carpenters may store lumber in their yards. The more lumber on site, the higher the potential for loss, so review should be based on the amount of storage and method. Often three-sided structures are used, which are highly susceptible to wind damage.

Inland Marine Exposures
Center on three areas: owned or rented tools and equipment, building materials (builders risk or installation exposure), and materials being transported to and from the job site. Carpenters’ tools and equipment are heavy but relatively easy to transport. However, if lumber or woodwork done at the shop is transported, there can be a significant exposure. Hazards include shifting and oversized loads, improper loading or tie down, all posing a serious loss potential. Equipment at a job site may be subject to drops from heights, weather damage, or being struck by vehicles. If equipment and supplies are left at job sites, then weather damage, theft and vandalism are common perils.

Premises Liability Exposures
At the carpenter’s shop or office are light unless there is woodworking and/or lumber storage. The potential fire hazard affects not only the insured but also neighboring businesses or homes, so controls in waste collection and fire control are important to protect the neighbors. Outdoor storage may create vandalism and attractive nuisance hazards that must be protected against. Job site exposures include the potential of injury to the public or to employees of other contractors, or damage to their property or completed work. Tools, power cords, building materials and scrap all pose trip hazards. The use of saws and other power or hand tools is hazardous to bystanders and other subcontractors on the job site. If installing or remodeling at a customer’s existing building, buildup of dust and scraps represents a potentially catastrophic fire and explosion hazard. Finally, the use of subcontractors as well as any contractual liability exposures should be examined.

Completed Operations
Is an important exposure. The carpenter may provide the framework upon which others build. Quality control and full compliance with all construction, material, and design specifications are necessary. Poor record-keeping may necessitate payment of otherwise questionable claims. Especially important are inspection and acceptance of the work by the owner or general contractor. Inadequate monitoring of work orders and change orders may be a concern.

Automobile Exposures
Are limited unless there is the transport of lumber and pre-made items. Hazards include failure to secure the load properly and equipment failure, especially tie-downs and hitches. Poor selection and training of drivers, or inadequate supervision poses a significant risk, especially with oversized loads. Failure to monitor driving records or to ensure drivers have the appropriate license may also be a concern. The age, condition, and maintenance of the vehicles are all important items to consider.

Workers Compensation
Hazards vary based on the size and nature of the job. Work with hand tools and sharp objects (e.g., saws and nails) is common to all types of carpentry. Lifting injuries such as hernias, strains and sprains plus back injuries may also occur. Minor injuries may be frequent even when the severity exposure is controlled. Absence of basic safety equipment, such as properly installed guards, steel-toed shoes, and eye protection may indicate a morale hazard. Employee selection, training and supervision affect the loss potential. On some jobs there may also be work at heights, potential injury from the carelessness of employees of other contractors, and occupational disease exposures such as noise, dust, and exposure to chemicals (e.g., working with pressure-treated lumber).

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What is the price of Carpentry Contractor insurance?

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Is insurance for Carpentry required in Florida?

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My dad has a business where some fiberglass work and carpentry work is done we have 2 guys that come and work with us and they get a 1099. Do we have to have workers comp? We do have liability insurance Thanks, being harrassed from the owner of the whole property who allows others on their property with just liabilty.

I’m not sure I fully understand your question but I will attempt to answer it assuming that by “property owner” you mean the owner of a location where you are doing some work for a client and by “have to have workers comp” you mean the statutory requirements to purchase the coverage.

The statutory requirements only discuss when a business must by workers compensation NOT when a business becomes liable for its employees (or subcontractors). A business is ALWAYS liable for its employees (or subcontractors) regardless of the requirement to buy the coverage. E.g. a retail store has one owner and two sales reps, though they are not required by law to carrier workers compensation (non-construction business must carry the coverage with 4 or more owners/employees) the owner of the store would still be liable if a stock shelf fell and hurt one of the sales reps. This is why some property owners require that anyone doing work on their property carry the coverage even if they are not “required” to.

In any construction business (carpentry would be considered construction) the statutory requirement to purchase coverage is with the first employee. A lot of small businesses believe they can get around this requirement by paying individuals that are performing work with them as 1099. Unfortunately that is not the measure used by the Florida Department of Labor to define an independent contractor. So sometimes these individuals are still considered “statutory employees”. This means that they are employees as far as the state is concerned but they are being paid as independent contractors. Statutory employees are treated as regular employees in the workers compensation statutes. This is another reason why some property owners require that businesses have the coverage as they don’t want to be responsible for the possibility of statutory employees.

In conclusion, the property owner may ask that you carry the coverage because though you may not be legally required to purchase it, that does not alleviate the possibility of having an accident that would eventually become the responsibility of the property owner if there is no coverage in place.

What other insurance should a Carpentry Contractor consider?

Business Personal Property, Contractors’ Equipment and Tool Floater, Employee Dishonesty, General Liability, Employee Benefits Liability, Umbrella Liability, Automobile Liability and Physical Damage, Hired and Non-ownership Auto, Workers Compensation

Can you provide insurance across the state?

We have helped customers all across the state of Florida. Below are some of the cities we have done business in.

  • Jacksonville
  • Miami
  • Tampa
  • St. Petersburg
  • Orlando
  • Hialeah
  • Tallahassee
  • Fort Lauderdale
  • Port St. Lucie
  • Pembroke Pines
  • Cape Coral
  • Hollywood
  • Gainesville
  • Miramar
  • Coral Springs
  • Clearwater
  • Miami Gardens
  • Palm Bay
  • West Palm Beach
  • Pompano Beach